Home Medicinal Plants Horsetail: Does it help against urinary tract disease?

Horsetail: Does it help against urinary tract disease?

by Josephine Andrews
Published: Last Updated on 249 views

Field horsetail (Equisetum arvense) has a weak diuretic effect and therefore helps with urinary tract diseases, kidney gravel and edema when used internally. Applied externally, it supports the treatment of poorly healing wounds. Read more about the field horsetail, its effect, application and possible side effects!

What is the effect of field horsetail?

The sterile, above-ground parts of field horsetail (also field horsetail or horsetail) are used medicinally as horsetail herb. Important ingredients are the abundant silicic acid (silicon) as well as flavonoids, silicates and caffeic acid derivatives.

Horsetail has different effects on the body:

diuretic effect

The ingredients have a diuretic effect. As a traditional herbal medicine, horsetail is therefore used internally for flushing therapy for bacterial and inflammatory diseases of the urinary tract or kidney gravel.

In addition, preparations with field horsetail can flush out water retention in the body (oedema).

Good for the bones

There is also evidence from animal and test-tube studies that horsetail is good for bones. Researchers attribute such an effect to the high silicic acid content and the resulting silicon dioxide. Silicon dioxide improves the formation, density and consistency of bone and cartilage tissue by promoting collagen synthesis and improving calcium absorption and utilization.

However, human studies are necessary to confirm these assumptions.

influence on hair

Studies suggest that horsetail can have a positive impact on hair. Here, too, the silicic acid is probably the main cause. In some cases, silicon reduces the rate of hair loss. In addition, the antioxidants contained in horsetail help against hair aging, which can be caused by so-called free radicals.

As a limitation of the studies, it should be mentioned that the researchers did not examine horsetail alone, but that the hair restorers used consisted of various ingredients – vitamin C and vegetable amino acids were also included, for example.

Promotes wound healing

Applied externally, the medicinal plant supports the treatment of poorly healing wounds. However, further research is needed to further support the evidence.

Use in folk medicine

In folk medicine, Equisetum arvense is also attributed a healing effect in other areas of application, for example in tuberculosis and on the joints in rheumatism and gout. Efficacy in these areas has not been scientifically proven.

How is horsetail used?

The medicinal plant helps both internally and externally. A wide variety of dosage forms are available, such as capsules, coated tablets, tablets and liquid preparations such as horsetail concentrate.

The dried herb is also used to prepare tea and extracts. The latter can be used for poultices, as well as baths.

To prepare the tea, pour 150 milliliters of boiling water over two teaspoons of chopped horsetail and strain after five to ten minutes. Unless otherwise directed, you can drink a cup of horsetail tea several times a day. The daily dose is six grams of horsetail herb. Also, drink plenty of fluids throughout the day.

As an alternative to tea, you can use ready-made preparations such as coated tablets, capsules, drops from Equisetum arvense – according to the information in the respective package insert or the recommendations of your doctor or pharmacist.

For poorly healing wounds, you can make a liquid horsetail extract for poultices: boil ten grams of horsetail in one liter of water for half an hour. Filter the liquid through a cloth and squeeze it out lightly. Soak gauze bandages in the decoction and apply to the affected areas of the skin.

Wound healing can also be supported with a horsetail bath (partial bath). Use two grams of horsetail in one liter of water for the bath additive.

What is the effect of field horsetail?

The sterile, above-ground parts of field horsetail (also field horsetail or horsetail) are used medicinally as horsetail herb. Important ingredients are the abundant silicic acid (silicon) as well as flavonoids, silicates and caffeic acid derivatives.

Horsetail has different effects on the body:

diuretic effect

The ingredients have a diuretic effect. As a traditional herbal medicine, horsetail is therefore used internally for flushing therapy for bacterial and inflammatory diseases of the urinary tract or kidney gravel.

In addition, preparations with field horsetail can flush out water retention in the body (oedema).

Good for the bones

There is also evidence from animal and test-tube studies that horsetail is good for bones. Researchers attribute such an effect to the high silicic acid content and the resulting silicon dioxide. Silicon dioxide improves the formation, density and consistency of bone and cartilage tissue by promoting collagen synthesis and improving calcium absorption and utilization.

However, human studies are necessary to confirm these assumptions.

influence on hair

Studies suggest that horsetail can have a positive impact on hair. Here, too, the silicic acid is probably the main cause. In some cases, silicon reduces the rate of hair loss. In addition, the antioxidants contained in horsetail help against hair aging, which can be caused by so-called free radicals.

As a limitation of the studies, it should be mentioned that the researchers did not examine horsetail alone, but that the hair restorers used consisted of various ingredients – vitamin C and vegetable amino acids were also included, for example.

Promotes wound healing

Applied externally, the medicinal plant supports the treatment of poorly healing wounds. However, further research is needed to further support the evidence.

Use in folk medicine

In folk medicine, Equisetum arvense is also attributed a healing effect in other areas of application, for example in tuberculosis and on the joints in rheumatism and gout. Efficacy in these areas has not been scientifically proven.

How is horsetail used?

The medicinal plant helps both internally and externally. A wide variety of dosage forms are available, such as capsules, coated tablets, tablets and liquid preparations such as horsetail concentrate.

The dried herb is also used to prepare tea and extracts. The latter can be used for poultices, as well as baths.

To prepare the tea, pour 150 milliliters of boiling water over two teaspoons of chopped horsetail and strain after five to ten minutes. Unless otherwise directed, you can drink a cup of horsetail tea several times a day. The daily dose is six grams of horsetail herb. Also, drink plenty of fluids throughout the day.

As an alternative to tea, you can use ready-made preparations such as coated tablets, capsules, drops from Equisetum arvense – according to the information in the respective package insert or the recommendations of your doctor or pharmacist.

For poorly healing wounds, you can make a liquid horsetail extract for poultices: boil ten grams of horsetail in one liter of water for half an hour. Filter the liquid through a cloth and squeeze it out lightly. Soak gauze bandages in the decoction and apply to the affected areas of the skin.

Wound healing can also be supported with a horsetail bath (partial bath). Use two grams of horsetail in one liter of water for the bath additive.

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